Trauma



Staff Care and the Haiti Earthquake: Normal Reactions to Abnormal Events

Michael Hegenauer, Director of Staff Care at World Vision International, describes how individuals typically respond in the aftermath of traumatic events.

For more information, see: http://www.worldvision.org/


PTSD has recently become a household term, thanks largely to its increasing recognition amongst military personnel. Despite the overlap between military and aid work, however, it remains overlooked and often under-addressed in the aid-working world.

Most who experience psychological trauma don't show signs or symptoms for at least 6 months. Then, they have difficulty focusing on a task. Relationships with loved ones become impaired. Relationships with colleagues become impaired. They become dysfunctional. (Michael Hegenauer, World Vision)

Many aid workers remain unsupported by their humanitarian employers and, thus, go without necessary treatment. Instead of feeling supported, aid workers often express feeling ostracized within their working environments and unable to admit that they have been affected by trauma - out of fear of being stigmatized or, worse, having their contracts discontinued.

Whether this fear is well-founded or not, it deserves reflection by both aid workers and their employers.

In this section, you will find:

Discussions around Trauma



GENERAL HOTLINES

AGENCIES OFFERING SUPPORT SPECIFICALLY TO AID WORKERS

HANDBOOKS, GUIDELINES, AND OTHER TOOLS

BOOKS ON TRAUMA

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