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Welcome to the global aid worker blog, which unites all of our voices into a stream of thoughts, ideas, rants, and inspirations, all wrapped up in one shared blog.

If you have a story related to aid work that you're ready to share with the public, have at it! Send us your piece, we'll help you fine tune it, give you a nod when we think it's fit to print, and put it up for the e-world to see.

Share any pieces you believe are pertinent to global aid workers via the Contact Us Form. Please feel free to submit your piece in English, French, or Spanish. If you would like to submit in another language, please do not hesitate! We can arrange for a translation to be done, if necessary.

  1. shannonmou

    Spots of a Leopard: On Being a Man

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    Gender. It’s a hot topic in the global aid-working world. Policy writers scratch away for hours, drafting policies that promote gender balance in staff hiring and pay. Meanwhile, those busy on the ground make every effort to favor female beneficiaries in the activities they implement, typically viewing women as the most vulnerable of the two sexes. But, what really does gender mean? Why is it so often associated with women, entirely omitting the male sex? Importantly, how does this focus on women in the discussion on gender affect men? How has the movement to promote women’s rights impacted the lives...
  2. admin

    Humanitarian Assistance: the View from the Other Side

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    by Randall Wood & Carmine DeLuca (an extract from The Dictator’s Handbook: a practical manual for the aspiring tyrant (2012, www.dictatorshandbook.net) You’re off to help provide desperately needed services to an ailing population whose well-meaning government is willing but unable to help them. Right? Wrong. The world’s dictators, tyrants, and autocrats are happy to invite you in, but on their terms only, where your largesse is just another opportunity for profit, power, and prestige. Here is the advice we provide to dictators. If you understand it, you understand how the “other side” is thinking about your project. The NGO community...
  3. admin

    He Gave Me More Than A Bracelet. He Gave Me HIV.

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    The beginning... After 7 months in country (serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer) I was already changing. The Peace Corps tends to do that to people. I had made new friends- both Americans and Zambians. I had gone through many ups and downs in the village and my workplace. I had learned the culture and the language. I had felt the homesickness and loneliness that only volunteers can know. And I had experienced the constant admiration and proposals from Zambian men. Those 7 months had been a challenge for sure, but overall I was enjoying my experience. I was enjoying...
  4. admin

    Haunted

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    Haunted. I am haunted by the human rights abuses to which I’ve become a witness. For years, through one-on-one interviews, I documented refugees’ flights from their homes. I became intimately familiar with who these people had been before they fled, why they had to flee their countries and under what circumstances. Through their descriptions, refugees transported me back to the attacks on their villages. I heard the guns and the cries of community members who were captured by the attackers. I saw the houses set ablaze amidst rebels decapitating male neighbors and raping girls and women alike. Some of those...

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