About


global aid worker offers humanitarian, relief and development workers a supportive, global community of peers and resources to help ease transitions into new locations, better equip aid workers for field realities, promote exchange on critical issues faced in the aid-working world, and provide a space for aid workers to bond through their unique but similar experiences around the globe.

By connecting online, aid workers in remote corners of the world feel less alone and more understood, those who have faced traumatic incidents can find support in others who have had similar experiences, and together humanitarian, development and relief workers can draw on similar experiences to help shape a more effective humanitarian and development system – to better serve those most in need.

Explore the global aid worker site to find what meets your needs . . .

Social Network Forum

General Resources for a New Aid-Working Stint

Resources to Help You Stay Safe and Well

Firsthand Reflections

Emergency Information

Your Role

Shannon with schoolchildren at Asphodel School, a school for vulnerable children, Kathmandu, Nepal

Shannon with schoolchildren at Asphodel School, a school for vulnerable children, Kathmandu, Nepal

The founder of global aid worker, Shannon, has worked several years for the UN. Often working in isolated locations, she has found that she and her colleagues seek greater connectedness with family and friends online. Yet, while friends and family can be our greatest support network, they often do not understand the depth of our experience as aid workers, the challenges, the sacrifices, or the traumas and pains that surface. Following Shannon's survival of a violent attack and the frequent sense of not being understood, she knew a site was critical to provide aid workers with the support otherwise lacking.

Shannon hopes that this site and its forums provide:

    Visitors: greater understanding of life as an aid worker and ways to support aid workers

    Aid Workers: a space to foster global connections and ease cross-cultural transitions

    Trauma Survivors: support and understanding from peers with similar backgrounds and traumatic experiences as well as survivor-recommended resources to aid in healing

    Beneficiaries of Aid Work: improved services, thanks to aid workers who have access to peer support and whose emphasis on personal well-being is reflected in their work

    ** Please note that Shannon is a staff member of the United Nations. However, the views herein are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations or of her colleagues. If you have any comments or suggestions, Shannon welcomes them. **


 

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